EAST ISLIP

Vegetable garden plots open to public at Brookwood Hall

Randall Waszynski
Posted 2/27/20

Keep Islip Clean has begun organizing for Project Bloom this year, and there are several opportunities for volunteers to tend to the contents of the greenhouse outside Brookwood Hall.

For 26 …

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EAST ISLIP

Vegetable garden plots open to public at Brookwood Hall

Posted

Keep Islip Clean has begun organizing for Project Bloom this year, and there are several opportunities for volunteers to tend to the contents of the greenhouse outside Brookwood Hall.

For 26 years, KIC volunteers have grown flowers from seed at the greenhouse and donated to more than 25 various KIC groups around the town for public purpose. The group as a whole produces between 6,000 and 7,000 plants per year that are distributed in May when they reach a certain size. Volunteers then plant them in public spaces around the Town of Islip.

“It is to beautify something for all of us to enjoy,” said Nancy Cochran, KIC’s director, at last Thursday’s meeting at Brookwood Hall. “They always could use a little bit of fresh help in the greenhouse.”

Regarding the greenhouse, Cochran said it is a sight to see, especially for public purpose.

“It is so cheerful. You walk in and there are just many levels of plants,” she said.

Although Cochran said the greenhouse is full, KIC’s chairman Nancy Donohue suggested that the greenhouse could supply room for additional seeds, in the case of an eager donor.

“‘Full’ is a subjective term. There is still room on the floor,” Donohue said.

The plants are acceptable to distribute for public spaces, including schools, churches and libraries. Additionally, welcome signs at the entrances of hamlets within the town are suitable, and in need.

“Signs are a perfect place to beautify because it is the entranceway to a community,” said Cochran, adding that those who distribute and plant the flowers over the years have typically been students who live within the Islip communities. “They just do a beautiful job, and you get the flowers for free.”

Switching gears from flowers to vegetables, Cochran said that, most years, KIC does not have the need to advertise the vegetable plots offered since it is usually filled. This year, though, there are currently unclaimed plots.

“It is a great and very lovely, pleasant place to raise vegetables if you do not have your own property, or if you just like the idea of company and fellowship of being with other gardeners,” she said.

Also, it was briefly mentioned that a local Eagle Scout plans to tidy up the pollinator garden here for his Eagle Scout project. Additionally, he would like to install a bug hotel. This would most likely be unfolding in the spring or summer.

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