GREAT RIVER

What could your future garden look like?

Arboretum hosts Symposium on the future of horticulture

Sam Desmond
Posted 2/27/20

On Monday, March 2, the Bayard Cutting Arboretum will be hosting a symposium on the “Evolution of the American Landscape: Gardening in the 21st Century,” where leaders in the horticulture …

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GREAT RIVER

What could your future garden look like?

Arboretum hosts Symposium on the future of horticulture

Posted

On Monday, March 2, the Bayard Cutting Arboretum will be hosting a symposium on the “Evolution of the American Landscape: Gardening in the 21st Century,” where leaders in the horticulture field from acclaimed backgrounds such as Cornell and Columbia University will be educating event attendees on the latest technology and sweeping trends in the industry.

Mainstays of the Arboretum, Dr. Doreen Monteleone, past president of the Bayard Cutting Arboretum Horticultural Society; Nelson Sterner, director; and Joy Arden, Geographic Information System (GIS) specialist, will be making presentations at the symposium, along with representations from the Wildlife Conservation Society, USDA Forest Service, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and the Bartlett Tree Research Laboratory and Arboretum.

“The Symposium is really about utilizing technology to maximize the horticultural projects, in both scope and health,” said Sterner about the overall theme of the event. 

One of the most exciting features of the Symposium is a discussion on the tree-mapping capabilities available for both amateur and professional horticulturalists. Contemporary imaging made possible by drones can map and monitor the health of your trees against weather and entomological conditions. iTree, developed by researchers with the U.S. Forest Service and software engineers at the Davey Institute, is user-friendly for residents, decision makers, and practitioners. The mobile application can help communities with overall planning of new trees to maximize benefits as trees have shown to help reduce air conditioning costs and reduce crime.

For history buffs, a portion of the Symposium will be dedicated to the history of horticulture in New York City. Discussed from the perspective of a landscape ecologist, event attendees can learn about the Manhattan of nature before becoming the concrete jungle of today. Contemporary computational methods were used to reconstruct New York’s past and to determine meaningful urban sustainability measures. 

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